Computer Science

Lower School

Using various programs and repetitive exercises students become comfortable using the computer. Proper use includes mastering the art of using the mouse and focusing on eye/hand coordination. These exercises lay the groundwork for more complex exercises. Extended Day students are shown how to browse the Internet (in a carefully controlled environment using visual search engines), and are taken to various websites that tie in with their other lessons. Students who already have a strong background in computers are given the opportunity to explore other applications according to their interests and abilities.


Lower Elementary

The Information Technology Curriculum integrates seamlessly with classroom academics. Students acquire a progression of skills through teacher instruction, self-directed software programs and cooperative and independent learning. Students use age-appropriate learning programs, become competent in the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Publisher, FrontPage) and safely and effectively utilize the Internet.

The new standards identify several higher-order thinking skills and digital citizenship as critical for students to learn effectively for a lifetime and live productively in our emerging global society. These areas include the ability to:

  • Demonstrate creativity and innovation
  • Communicate and collaborate
  • Conduct research and use information
  • Think critically, solve problems, and make decisions
  • Use technology effectively and productively
  • Cosmic Education

Upper Elementary

The Information Technology Curriculum integrates seamlessly with classroom academics. Students acquire a progression of skills through teacher instruction, self-directed software programs and cooperative and independent learning. Students use age-appropriate learning programs, become competent in the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Publisher, FrontPage) and safely and effectively utilize the Internet.

The new standards identify several higher-order thinking skills and digital citizenship as critical for students to learn effectively for a lifetime and live productively in our emerging global society.

Middle School

The Information Technology Curriculum integrates seamlessly with classroom academics. Students routinely bring their assignments into IT class to utilize the programs and research techniques they have learned.
Students acquire a progression of skills through teacher instruction, self-directed software programs and cooperative and independent learning. Students use age-appropriate learning programs, become competent in the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Publisher, FrontPage) and safely and effectively utilize the Internet.

As foundational technology skills penetrate throughout our society, students will be expected to apply the basics in authentic, integrated ways to solve problems, complete projects, and creatively extend their abilities. ISTE's NETS for Students (2007) help students prepare to work, live, and contribute to the social and civic fabric of their communities.

The new standards identify several higher-order thinking skills and digital citizenship as critical for students to learn effectively for a lifetime and live productively in our emerging global society. These areas include the ability to:

  • Demonstrate creativity and innovation
  • Communicate and collaborate
  • Conduct research and use information
  • Think critically, solve problems, and make decisions
  • Use technology effectively and productively