×Admissions

Admissions


Dear Parents,

Discover the wonders of a FWM education!  Walk through the doors of Fraser Woods Montessori School and you will feel welcomed and inspired.  You will find a community of teachers, administrators, students and parents coming together to explore, learn and grow.

I welcome you to take that walk and visit us, schedule a classroom observation, meet our Head of School and walk through our beautiful campus to see just how good a small school experience can be!

Our web site provides a great resource of information about our school and as the Admissions Director and mother of three Fraser Woods Montessori students, I am happy to answer all your questions about our school or the admissions process.  Please contact me either by telephone or by using the Contact Us link listed above.

Thank you for your interest in Fraser Woods Montessori.  I look forward to speaking with you soon.

Sincerely,

Alison Kistner
Director of Admissions
(203) 426-3390 ext.305

 

Fraser Woods Montessori School welcomes students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the programs and activities offered at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic or other school programs.

 

Toddler and Lower School (preschool)

Toddlers must be 15 months old in September and do not have to be toilet trained. Lower School students must be at least three years old by December 31 and toilet trained.

  • Schedule a parent visit: Please call to schedule the visit. This visit is only for adults and consists of a 20-minute classroom observation, a campus tour and an opportunity for informal discussions about the school.
  • Submit an application: Families expecting a March decision are asked to submit all required application materials by February 1.
  • Schedule a student orientation visit: You will be contacted to bring your child to the school for a short visit.
  • Enrollment contracts are issued: After all of the above has been completed, the school will review applications for placement. Upon acceptance, enrollment contracts are issued in March. In order to guarantee a place for your child, contracts must be returned by the contract due date with a non-refundable tuition deposit.
  • Schedule a visit to FWM
  • FWM Admissions Application

Elementary School (grades 1-5)

  • Schedule a parent visit: Please call to schedule the visit. This visit is only for adults and consists of a 20-minute classroom observation, a campus tour and an opportunity for informal discussions about the school.
  • Submit an application: The application is due to the Admissions Office by February 1st.
  • Submit the required forms:Please give the following forms to your child’s present school. They will mail them directly to us:
    • Head’s Recommendation Form (signed by you to authorize release of records)
    • English Teacher Recommendation Form
    • Math Teacher Recommendation Form
  • Schedule a student visit: Please schedule an all-day classroom visit for your child.
  • February 1 forms deadline: Families expecting a March decision are asked to submit all required application materials by February 1.
  • Enrollment contracts are issued: After all of the above has been completed, the school will review applications for placement. Upon acceptance, enrollment contracts are issued in March. In order to guarantee a spot for your child, contracts must be returned by the contract due date with a non-refundable tuition deposit.
  • Schedule a visit to FWM
  • FWM Admissions Application

Middle School (grades 6-8)

  • Schedule a parent visit: Please call to schedule the visit. This visit is only for adults and consists of a 20-minute classroom observation, a campus tour and an opportunity for informal discussions about the school.
  • Submit an application: The application is due to the Admissions Office by February 1.
  • Submit the required forms:Please give the following forms to your child’s present school. They will mail them directly to us:
    • Head’s Recommendation Form (signed by you to authorize release of records)
    • English Teacher Recommendation Form
    • Math Teacher Recommendation Form
  • Submit a writing sample: We ask that a graded writing sample from your child’s teacher be sent directly to us.
  • Submit the Parent Questionnaire
  • Schedule a student visit: Please schedule an all-day classroom visit for your child.
  • February 1 Forms Deadline: Families expecting a March decision are asked to submit all required application materials by February 1.
  • Enrollment contracts are issued: After all of the above has been completed, the school will review applications for placement. Upon acceptance, enrollment contracts are issued in March. In order to guarantee a spot for your child, contracts must be returned by the contract due date with a non-refundable tuition deposit.
  • Schedule a visit to FWM
  • FWM Admissions Application

Tuition 2018/19

Academic Programs Duration Schedule Monthly Tuition
Toddler Half Day (15 months – 3) 3 days 8:30 – 11:30 $757 $8,410
4 days 8:30 – 11:30 $944 $10,485
5 days 8:30 – 11:30 $1,158 $12,870
Toddler Full Day (15 months – 3) 3 days 8:30 – 3:00 $1,037 $11,520
4 days 8:30 – 3:00 $1,346 $14,950
5 days 8:30 – 3:00 $1,654 $18,375
Lower School Half Day Ages 3 and 4 4 days 8:30 – 11:30 $911 $10,120
Lower School Half Day Ages 3 and 4 5 days 8:30 – 11:30 $1,120 $12,405
Lower School Full Day Ages 3 and 4 4 days 8:30 – 3:00 $1,346 $14,950
Lower School Full Day Ages 3, 4 & 5 5 days 8:30 – 3:00 $1,654 $18,375
Kindergarten 5 days 8:30 – 3:00 $1,654 $18,375
Elementary School (grades 1 – 5) 8:15 – 3:00 $1,845 $20,500
Middle School (grades 6 – 8) 8:00 – 3:00 $2,093 $23,250

*Monthly amount based on balance after initial ten percent of tuition is received and is based on ten school months. Tuition may be paid monthly divided over 12 months maximum, quarterly, semi-annually or annually. Ten percent of tuition is due upon signing enrollment contract.

Before School Program

Schedule Monthly Tuition
Part or full time 7:00 – 8:30 $80 $800
Occasional Use: per day 7:00 – 8:30 $20

*No cost for students that enroll in After School Program – 5 days per week.

After School Program

1 day per week (or 33 days) 3:00 – 6:00 $85 $850
2 days per week (or 66 days) 3:00 – 6:00 $163 $1,625
3 days per week (or 99 days) 3:00 – 6:00 $233 $2,325
4 days per week (or 132 days) 3:00 – 6:00 $295 $2,950
5 days per week (or 165 days) 3:00 – 6:00 $350 $3,500
Occasional Use: per day 3:00 – 6:00 $35

*Annual contracts for the Before and/or After School programs reflect a lower daily rate than occasional use. A 25% sibling discount will apply to the second child’s Before and/or After School tuition for families who sign annual before and/or After School contracts.

Student Support Fee Structure:

Student Support Services provides direct instructional support to students with various learning styles in a positive, nurturing environment.  The following options are available for students who the school has identified as needing services.

Option 1 Year-Long support: For those students who have been identified as needing ongoing support throughout the school year.  One day per week at $1000 for the school year (two days, $2000 for the school year; three days, $3000 for the school year)

Option 2 Six-week package: Students will be seen three times a week for six weeks for targeted intervention. At the conclusion of the six week session, we will determine if additional support is warranted.  Six Week Package: Eighteen sessions, $550

Option 3 Drop-in services: If the school determines that a student will benefit from short-term support (less than six weeks).  Sessions for drop in support $35 per session

Other Fees:

Parent Association Fee: $50

Volunteer Hours: Each family is expected to volunteer a minimum of 10 hours. If this is not possible, you may pay a waiver fee.

Overnight Field Trips: Overnight field trips for Elementary & Middle School students will require an additional fee.

Books (Middle School): Textbooks are purchased by the parents though the online bookstore.

Annual Fund: Fraser Woods Montessori School asks each family to consider a tax-deductible donation to the Annual Fund. These funds help bridge the gap between tuition and the cost of educating each student. The goal is participation rather than the size of the donation.

Tuition Assistance: Funds are available for part of the annual tuition. Contact the Admissions Office for details. Tuition Assistance applications are due by March 1st of the prior school year. After this date, Tuition Assistance applications will be reviewed on a case by case basis subject to available funds. Tuition Assistance and admissions decisions are made separately.

Tuition Assistance

We believe that diversity enriches our school community and that every child has the right to access a quality education in a Montessori environment regardless of his/her family’s socio-economic standing. While it is not possible to ensure this right for all children, it is our objective to institute a program of assistance to avail that right to some children who would otherwise be denied. FWM does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion or ethnic origin with respect to the admission of students and the employment of staff.  Download FWM’s Financial Assistance Policy.

Eligibility

  • Any family with a child attending FWM
  • Any new family entering the school
  • Tuition assistance is not available for the Toddler Program

Basic Requirements

  • Families must demonstrate financial need due to annual income level or an unexpected financial crisis.
  • A minimum tuition for each child is required of all families. Parents are expected to pay as much tuition as possible.
  • Child’s admission application is only required for newly entering student.

How to Apply

  • Complete the Tuition Assistance Application online. For prospective families, your child’s admissions application must be completed and returned to the school prior to completing your tuition assistance application.
  • Send all other paperwork including copy of your most recent filed tax return, nontaxable Income Worksheet, and Business/Farm Statement (if applicable) to School and Student Services for Financial Aid.

When to Apply

  • January 19th – February 12th
  • Letters will be sent with the awarded assistance at the beginning of May.

Classroom Observations

“When dealing with children there is greater need for observing than of questioning.”  – Maria Montessori

Observation is one of the Montessori teacher’s greatest tools, and one of the keystones of this approach to education.  It has many levels of application.  It can become a life-long tool to help us evolve, as parents, as teachers, and as human beings.

A teacher observes the class as a whole many times throughout the day, in a scanning, all-inclusive way.  She watches for the flow of traffic, groupings of children, places where movement may be inhibited, and difficult interactions among children. A teacher also carefully observes the work of individual children, as they manifest themselves one by one:  what material is he using, how is he using it, is he concentrating, should the teacher or assistant step in to help, is the child ready for the next step and challenge?  He or she uses this observed information to plan lessons, to bring out new materials or to vary an existing activity, and to approach the child in a fresh way at a different time.  Observation can be inspiring and energizing.

Parent Observation Guidelines

The teachers are happy to have observers in their classrooms.  In order to help keep the classroom situation as natural as possible during your visit, we would like to recommend the following:

  1. When you enter the classroom, you will be given a seat.  We encourage you to observe from this vantage point, rather than standing or walking about the classroom.  It is important for your presence to be as unobtrusive as possible.
  2. The Montessori classroom is one that is active and invites participation; however, we ask that you please refrain from conversation.  There are occasions when a child will approach an observer.  If this happens during your visit, please answer the child naturally, but briefly.
  3. To help children feel comfortable while you are there, please watch the activities that are further away from you rather than directly in front of you.  While we encourage your interest and questions about the Montessori materials and approaches, it is better for the children that individual work projects are not questioned and classroom materials are left on the shelves.
  4. Should you have any questions, please write them down.  We will be happy to answer them in your meeting with the head of school and the director of admissions.

Montessori vs Traditional

“We cannot know the consequences of suppressing a child’s spontaneity when he is just beginning to be active.  We may even suffocate life itself.  That humanity which is revealed in all its intellectual splendor during the sweet and tender age of childhood should be respected with a kind of religious veneration.  It is like the sun which appears at dawn or a flower just beginning bloom.  Education cannot be effective unless it helps a child to open up himself to life.”  -Maria Montessori

The Story of MARIA MONTESSORI Excerpt from AMS

Maria Montessori was born in the town of Chiaravalle, Italy, on August 31, 1870.  She became one of the first female physicians in Italy upon her graduation from medical school in 1896. In her medical practice, her clinical observations led her to analyze how children learn, and she concluded that they build themselves from what they find in their environment. Shifting her focus from the body to the mind, she returned to the university in 1901, this time to study psychology and philosophy. In 1904, she was made a professor of anthropology at the University of Rome.

Her desire to help children was so strong, however, that in 1906 she gave up both her university chair and her medical practice to work with a group of sixty young children of working parents in the San Lorenzo district of Rome. It was there that she founded, on January 6, 1907, the first Casa dei Bambini, or “Children’s House.” What ultimately became the Montessori method of education developed there, based upon Montessori’s scientific observations of these children’s almost effortless ability to absorb knowledge from their surroundings, as well as their tireless interest in manipulating materials. Every piece of equipment, every exercise, every method Montessori developed was based on what she observed children to do “naturally,” by themselves, unassisted by adults.

Children teach themselves. This simple but profound truth inspired Montessori’s lifelong pursuit of educational reform, methodology, psychology, teaching, and teacher training–all based on her dedication to furthering the self-creating process of the child.

Maria Montessori made her first visit to the United States in 1913, the same year that Alexander Graham Bell and his wife Mabel founded the Montessori Educational Association at their Washington, DC, home. Among her other strong American supporters were Thomas Edison and Helen Keller.

In 1915, she attracted world attention with her “glass house” schoolroom exhibit at the Panama-Pacific International Exhibition in San Francisco. On this second U.S. visit, she also conducted a teacher training course and addressed the annual conventions of both the National Education Association and the International Kindergarten Union. The committee that brought her to San Francisco included Margaret Wilson, the daughter of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. She was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize three times–in 1949, 1950, and 1951.

Montessori Program Traditional Program
The method respects individual differences Emphasis is on conforming to the group
Students learn at their own pace, free to complete a project or pursue a subject as deeply as they wish, according to personal enthusiasm Subjects are taught in lecture form and students must change classes and attend lessons all at the same time
Universal values (honesty, respect, compassion, fairness, etc.) are an integral part of our classroom community. Values are not emphasized.
The learning process is student-centered and emphasizes self-motivation Emphasis is on grades, punishments or rewards as motivating factors
The classroom is used as a library or resource room for studying and completing projects: students are free to move as needed and are active participants in building their own knowledge Students work at desks, passively listening to lecture for directions and instructions. Passive learning is more tiring and the school work day has to be divided into periods with planned interruptions
Multi-age grouping is practiced so that students may benefit from peer teaching/learning. Students are grouped chronologically to suit teachers’ pre-planned class lessons
Testing is built into the Montessori method as the third period of the “three-period lesson” and is a teaching technique that is applied routinely on an individual bases. The purpose of all testing here is to allow self-correction, repetition and achieve competence at one’s own pace Scheduled testing does not take into consideration the preparation of each individual student. It assumes that all students learn at the same rate. Tests are not designed as teaching tools, but rather as rewarding or punitive methods. The pass or fail grades simple reflect if a student has conformed or not to class standards

Transportation

Newtown/Sandy Hook children in grades kindergarten through eighth grade are eligible for bus transportation provided by the town at no additional cost.